Congregational Awards

Each year, Calgary Unitarians make two awards: the Harold and Marion Panabaker Award for extraordinary services to the congregation, and the William Irvine Justice Award for social and environmental justice in the Calgary community.

The Harold and Marion Panabaker Award

The objective of the Harold and Marion Panabaker Award is to allow the Calgary Unitarians to honour a person or persons for extraordinary services provided to benefit the Church community.

Rules and guidelines are herein provided to document the selection process and to further clarify the spirit in which this award is made.

Rules

  1. Nominations must be made in writing by members of Calgary Unitarians and must include reasons for nominating the person or persons.
  2. Members of the Board may not submit nominations.
  3. Persons who have been staff members or members of the Board in the preceding year are not eligible to receive the award.
  4. The Board of Trustees will select the winner of the award from among the nominees.
  5. There is no limit on the number of times a person may be nominated.
  6. Nominations from prior years will not automatically be carried forward, but a nomination from a previous year may be resubmitted.

Guidelines

  1. Since there is only one award to be presented each year, there will usually be only one recipient. Exceptions may occur when extraordinary services were provided in a joint effort or, more rarely, when the contributions of more persons appear so equally deserving that it would seem unjust to exclude one person in favour of another.
  2. There are no rules to define what constitutes a service to the Church community.
  3. Factors which might be considered include:
    – benefits to the Church community
    – personal sacrifice or effort involved in providing service
    – the degree to which the service reflects values esteemed by Unitarian Universalists in general
  4. Direct financial contributions, though certainly a service to the Church community, are not considered to be a major factor
  5. On rare occasions, the award might be presented to a person who is neither a member of the Church nor attends it. As an example, extreme in Canada at present, a person might be instrumental in preserving the Church by defending its right to exist in the face of legislative or other threats.
  6. A plaque is mounted on the wall of the Church listing the names of the recipients. A small plaque is presented to the recipient

Past Harold and Marion Panabaker Award Recipients

2007: Christine Michell
2009: Dorothy Bond and John Michell
2010: Penney Kome and Lynn Nugent
2011: Gorham Hussey
2012: Peter and Joan Riches
2013: Susan Stratton
2014: Bev Webber
2015: Carl Svoboda
2016: Leslie Buckle
2017: Jane Ebbern and Brandis Purcell
2018: no nominations
2019: Donna Ontonio and O.J. Zawalsky
2020: Joan Brown

Prior Award for Extraordinary Service to the Unitarian Church of Calgary

Past William Irvine Award for Extraordinary Service to the Unitarian Church of Calgary Award Recipients

1989: Ruth Barker
1990: Marion Panabaker
1991: Sandy Tyndale
1992: Helen and Rick Green
1993: Ruth Staughton
1994: John Backhouse
1995: Bob Spinney
1996: Pat and Alan Jessop
1997: Bob and Marion McPherson

1998: Dick Wilson and Dorothy Lloyd
1999: Marie and John Collins
2000: Marsha Haug and Eric Leavitt
2001: Helen Backhouse
2002: Mary Jane Hussey
2003: Jennie Paine
2004: Ward Neale
2005: No winner was declared in 2005
2006: No winner was declared in 2006

The William Irvine Justice Award

The objective of the William Irvine Justice Award is to allow Calgary Unitarians to honour a person(s) or organization for extraordinary services provided to benefit social and/or environmental justice in the Calgary community.

Rules and guidelines are herein provided to document the selection process and to further clarify the spirit in which this award is made.

Rules

  1. Nominations must be made in writing by members of the Calgary Unitarians to the Social Justice Committee and must include reasons for nominating the person or persons.
  2. The Social Justice Committee recommends one nominee to the Board of Trustees at least two months prior to the award dinner.
  3. The Board of Trustees votes on whether to award this person or persons. The final decision must be supported by a majority of the Board members present.
  4. There is no limit on the number of times a person may be nominated.
  5. Nominations from prior years will not automatically be carried forward.

Guidelines

  1. Since there is only one award to be presented each year, there will usually be only one recipient. Exceptions may occur when extraordinary services were provided in a joint effort or, more rarely, when the contributions of more persons appear so equally deserving that it would seem unjust to exclude one person in favour of another.
  2. There are no rules to define what constitutes a social and/or environmental service to the Calgary community. Factors which might be considered include:
  • benefits to the Calgary community
  • personal sacrifice or effort involved in providing service
  • the degree to which the service reflects values esteemed by Unitarian Universalists in general
  1. On rare occasions, the award might be presented to a person who is a member of the Church, but this award is intended to recognize those who are carrying on the legacy of William Irvine in championing justice in Calgary, Alberta and Canada.
  2. A call for nominations should be made at least three months prior to each William Irvine Justice Award and nominations in writing should be submitted to the Chair of the Social Justice Council.

Past William Irvine Justice Award Recipients

2007: The Very Reverend Bill Phipps
2009: Mel and Joan Teghtmeyer2010: Sharon Stevens
2011: Calgary Co­operative Memorial Society
2012: Occupy Calgary
2013: Dr. David Swann
2014: Carolyn Pogue
2017 Susan G Gillies, and The Women’s Center of Calgary
2018 Derek Cook